Journal of the Korean Academy of Pediatric Dentistry 2008;35(1):167-174.
Published online February 29, 2008.
MANDIBULAR PRIMARY MOLARS WITH 3 ROOTS : CASE REPORT
Je Seon Song, Byung-Jai Choi, Hyung-Jun Choi, Jae-Ho Lee, Heung-Kyu Son, Seong-Oh Kim
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry and Oral Science Research Center Yonsei University 
Correspondence:  Seong-Oh Kim,  Tel: 02-2228-3171, Email: ksodds@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr
Abstract
Mandibular first molar and primary molars usually have two roots, on the mesial and distal sides. Occasionally, these molars have an extra root located in the distolingual aspect. Prevalence of the 3-rooted first permanent molar shows ethnic variation, ranging from about 3% in Caucasian to about 20% in Mongoloid group, which includes Chinese, Japanese, Eskimo, American and Canadian Indians. The frequency of the mandibular molar with three roots decreases in the order of the first permanent molar, the second primary molar, and the first primary molar. If the mandibular first or second primary molar has an additional distolingual root, the adjacent molars, including the first permanent molar, posterior to it also may have it. Coronal morphologic change can occur in the mandibular first primary molars with three roots: the crown had more triangular-shape compared to the one with two roots, possibly affected by the presence of additional distolingual root. Clinically, exact diagnosis and treatment should be taken with those teeth for pulp canal treatment, extraction, and SS Cr.
Key Words: Additional root, Mandibular primary molars, Mandibular first permanent molar, Coronal morphologic change, Mongoloid group


ABOUT
BROWSE ARTICLES
EDITORIAL POLICY
FOR CONTRIBUTORS
Editorial Office
Seoul National University, Dental Hospital, B1-166 101, Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Republic of Korea
Tel: +82-70-4145-8875    Fax: +82-2-745-8875    E-mail: info@kapd.org                

Copyright © 2022 by Korean Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

Developed in M2PI

Close layer
prev next